Online property mistakes to avoid

The new world of selling a home online has opened up an easy to use, easy to manipulate platform that allows a quick sale with estate agents fees that are far cheaper than those on the high street. The valuation is quick, listings on prominent sites are swift and professional, and usually the whole process can be more satisfactory.

 

However, mistakes can be made. This is a brave new world for many sellers who are familiar with paper listings and photographs of properties in bricks and mortar premises, with visits from surveyors and constant phone calls from offices. Therefore, shifting to a digital-only world can save money, but create issues if not done properly. Here are five mistakes that the online seller should avoid.

 

Not being on all the sites that are needed

This year estate agents have launched OntheMarket.com, an online portal designed to get a grip on the digital market for houses, and specifically targeting Zoopla and Rightmove. If agents sign up to OntheMarket then properties can go on one of the other two, but not both.

 

Zoopla appears to have missed out in comparison to Rightmove, but it’s still one of the best options compared to the smaller estate agents. Therefore, tread carefully when deciding whether to go for the ‘new kid on the block’.

 

Bad photos

There’s a market in property staging – the profession of making a home look attractive on photographs. A simple rearrangement of furniture to create a vibrant, interesting workspace will show the home in its best light, but poor lighting and composition, showing a constricted, cluttered and clumsy home, will kill your chances of a quick sale. If you need an expert or a friend who knows their way around a DSLR, then use them.

 

Not being flexible with viewings

You may expect to get a flurry of interest after signing up with an estate agent, and particularly one that’s posted your property on some of the sites mentioned above.

Viewings should follow and you can choose an all-inclusive viewing service, or carry them out yourself and save a further penny or two.

 

But if you take this road be aware that you’ll have to find space in your work/life diary to carry this out. It can be a frustrating and potentially money-losing decision if viewings are repeatedly vetoed. No estate agent will be present which might seem a little strange.

 

Not going for enough options

Many online estate agents offer a range of customisable options for the seller, which can be both an advantage and disadvantage. That’s because you might have restricted your chances too much. Maybe you’ve got a home that will need half a year to sell, and you’ve only paid for three months. Maybe you didn’t pay for help with viewings, and due to circumstances outside your control you suddenly find yourself unable to host them – and miss out on potential visits.

 

Not using social media

There’s a free avenue of support for selling your house on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and others. If you’ve created the listing, got the professional pictures in place, and created all the information that’s shows your property in a good light, then surely the next logical move is to promote it to friends and followers. You can arrange viewings and answer queries, and it will be spread far and wide very quickly.