House hunting for the quintessential English home

by Housesimple on 7th July 2017

According to last year's HomeOwner Survey, over half of Brits fancy a home with some history and we doubt it’s just the age that appeals. The quintessential English property is full of charm, quirky features and timeless style.

To help you unearth your own dream house, we’ve scoured our listings for the best of the bunch.

Isham, Northamptonshire

This honey-coloured, 17th-century cottage near Kettering proves that beauty isn’t only skin deep. Inside, there's plenty of character with exposed beams, an open fireplace and period doors.

If it's a postcard-worthy thatched roof you're after, you're in luck. There are over 60,000thatched properties in the UK. They’re more common in corn-growing counties like Norfolk and The Cotswolds and survive better in well-connected and maintained villages.

Tiverton, Devon

Farmhouses are the ultimate rural retreat. Especially if, like this three-bed in Devon, they come with oodles of land to grow your own veg and a private stream. Outbuildings also provide the potential for renovation into holiday lets. 

Naturally, traditional farming counties like Herefordshire and Cumbria are the go-to places for a farmhouse. If you can’t see yourself out in the sticks though, urban farms do exist in the UK's big cities.

Lyddington, Rutland

The heart of England is packed to the oak rafters with quaint rural villages, each with its own idyllic features. If you’re really lucky, you might find yourself a property in a spot like this five-bed period house that overlooks the village green. 

The Open Spaces Society reckons there are at least 3,650 registered greens in England, so there are plenty of peaceful public parks throughout the country to choose from.

Oldham, Greater Manchester

English properties aren’t all about the countryside. This converted cotton mill in Oldham is just one of many former industrial buildings up and down the country that's been converted into flats or townhouses. Wide windows, rooms with tall ceilings and original fittings mean lots of space and plenty of light. 

Similar conversions can be found in industrial towns and cities from Bristol to Sheffield, each with their own unique style.

Southport, Merseyside

We do like to be beside the seaside, so it’s no surprise that Britain's elegant Victorian promenades are rapidly returning to their former glory. 

Flat conversions like this one in Southport offer a slice of history alongside the fresh sea air – and it’s not alone. Towns like Eastbourne, Blackpool and Southend all offer well-preserved Victorian seafronts and townhouses with breathtaking views.