Brighton biking

The London to Brighton bike ride is celebrating its 40th year in 2016. A great way to get fit and raise money, the race rolls through 54 miles of gorgeous countryside.

As online estate agents, we're more interested in the fact that it runs between two of England's most desirable property markets. London's property prices often lead the UK, but Brighton and Hove is a strong contender. Over the past two decades, house prices in Brighton and Hove have increased by nearly 500%: the biggest price jump in England and Wales.

Brighton at a glance

Brighton has had a bohemian reputation since the late 18th century, when the Prince Regent took over the town. Wild tales of his hedonism are still popular in the trendy bars of Brighton, while contemporary party animals do their part to keep the prince's spirit alive. It's the place to be if you like things weird and wonderful: from raves on the beach to outlandishly creative shopping in The Lanes.

Hove, actually

Hove is Brighton's slightly more refined sister town. It's where the hipsters go once they've grown up. This is the enclave of yummy mummies, start-up millionaires and presenter Zoe Ball. Regency architecture dominates in impressive terraces, while shops tend to sit at the higher end of the scale. Excellent delis, wine bars and a huge array of cuisines mean this part of town is just as vibrant as Brighton (if slightly lower key).

Selling in Brighton: what to expect

Brighton attracts a certain sort of buyer: creative, offbeat and with a lust for life. The city's booming property market means that young buyers are a rarity. Middle-aged professionals swapping the London rat race for a new role in a start-up by the sea are one demographic to look out for. Another is the "double income no kids" (DINK) demographic: couples in their mid-thirties who are choosing a better quality of life over a shorter commute. They're most likely to look at properties in North Laine, West Hill and Clifton to be near the train station.